Forum : New Feature Suggestions/Requests

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Topic: tilted images

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deanmacgregor (Over 1 year ago)
Why does photosynth sometimes tilt the synth photos so that i have to turn my head to see?  i dont see why it should...will this be fixed
Nathanael (Over 1 year ago)
Dean, would you mind collecting some 'Share' links to examples of what you're talking about, just so we are certain what we are discussing?

Any time that you're viewing a tilted photo, just click the 'Share' icon to get a link to that exact position in the synth so that when others click on it, we'll be able to see just what you were seeing. Multiple examples would be helpful. The more the better, really, up to ten or so.
Nathanael (Over 1 year ago)
Okay, Dean, I just looked at your synths and I'm assuming that you're talking about effects like the ones observed in this one: http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=d810e311-6114-453e-bac0-c00c9909a38a

First two tips about the viewer. 

In the Direct3D viewer (the old Windows only one http://photosynth.net/d3d/photosynth.aspx?cid=d810e311-6114-453e-bac0-c00c9909a38a ), you can use the [Y] key to toggle between 'World Up' (which attempts to keep the point cloud right side up at all times and just overlay the photo on the right bit of point cloud) and 'Photo Up' (which simply displays the photo at the orientation that it was uploaded at).
Nathanael (Over 1 year ago)
For the Silverlight viewer, you (as the synth author) can open the synth editor, go to the [Advanced] tab, and select 'Photo Up' and click [Save]. This way, everyone will see your photos at the same angle that you uploaded them. If you uploaded them right side up (as you have), then that's what people will see. If you uploaded the photos on their side, though, then that is what people will see, if you select 'Photo Up'.

If you have a good clean point cloud, you can actually upload photos that were taken at or rotated to funny angles before you synthed and they will actually be displayed correctly within the synth. See the second photo (2nd in 2D view - I've actually linked you to start on it) in this synth for a small example: http://bit.ly/marksvisitsynth
Nathanael (Over 1 year ago)
What has gone wrong with your synth that I linked to above is that the reconstruction (point cloud and the photos' relationship) is unreliable. When weak links are formed between photos, the point cloud can twist or warp, which will really begin to mess with which way the synth thinks is 'up'.

I can see that you have really put some effort into shooting your synths, so I know that you care about it coming out right. Please don't be offended, but I think that the way that you shoot might have something to do with the problems that you're experiencing when combined with how Photosynth works today.
Nathanael (Over 1 year ago)
I see that while you do shoot with overlap between your photos, but from what I have seen so far you often seem to pay more attention to the edges of your photos overlapping while not worrying too much about the middle of the photos. 

I would encourage you to think a bit differently. In fact, I would go so far as to say to make sure that the center (doesn't have to be the exact center) of your photos overlap and don't pay much mind to whether the edges overlap.
Nathanael (Over 1 year ago)
Think of moving through an environment when you're shooting a Photosynth like you're rock climbing. You always want to be sure that you have a firm grip on something before you let go and move to your next grip. Likewise, when shooting a synth, I find it helpful to always be thinking of what I am currently tracking in the camera's field of view. Only after I have some good coverage of what I'm currently tracking will I start tracking both it and the next object. Once you can frame what Photosynth is currently holding onto and what it will be hanging onto next, you can 'shift your weight and make the jump', so to speak, to the next part of the scene.

I should stress that this isn't the only way to shoot a synth (there may be things that you are already doing right which I haven't yet absorbed), but it has proven quite reliable for me. Give it a shot and let me know how it goes for you.
deanmacgregor (Over 1 year ago)
ok thanks for that.  I have turned it to photo up and nothing is tilted now.  The navigation is quite tricky to use on this synth, so i will take you advice so that i can decide to walk around mums house whenever i like online.  I love photosynth
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