Forum : Advice & Critiques

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Topic: Ho to do 360 turn smoothly

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sniziolek (Over 1 year ago)
I am currently taken pictures of objects and I want the view to move around the object smoothly 360 degrees. All the synths on the main page move around a point looking outward; I want to do the opposite where the synth moves around a point looking inward 360 degrees, smoothly. Any thoughts? I'm new to things so anything will help!
johnsonc2008 (Over 1 year ago)
just take a bunch of photos of the object while walking around it. If you want it smoothly I imagine you'd have to do all the photos with the same focal distance, with the same space between each photograph and all at the same distance from the ground and at the same angle to the object.
NateLawrence (Over 1 year ago)
Hello, guys.

The Photosynth website currently hosts two different types of imagery: panoramas and photosynths.

You can upload panoramas to the website in three ways, currently. Use Microsoft Research's free panorama stitcher ICE ( http://bit.ly/msrice ), use the plugin for Adobe Photoshop ( http://bit.ly/pstops ), or use the Photosynth app for iOS ( http://bit.ly/photosynthforios ). As sniziolek notes, panoramas are created from a single point of view, looking outward in many directions. The closer the subjects of your photos are, the more important it is for your camera's lens to stay the same exact place in the air. Panoramas are not photosynths.
NateLawrence (Over 1 year ago)
On the other hand, we have photosynths. These do allow you to move your camera around an object and in just about any camera motion that you can imagine, from simple orbits and strafes to much more complex paths. You do not need to maintain equal distance between shots or distance from the subject. Currently, you can only create photosynths with the Photosynth app for Windows. Photosynths are not panoramas.

In the past, the Photosynth team members have showed an experimental version of their viewer which projected the photos onto the actual geometry that was reconstructed, rather than projecting the photos onto flat rectangles that lie between the reconstructed geometry and the virtual camera. Microsoft Research has recently been showing extremely similar work called 'Spin Movies' and their work seems to me to be a perfect fit for an update to the Photosynth site later this year. 

More info in this video's description: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WjMwbmJj8o
sniziolek (Over 1 year ago)
so natelawrence, I watched the youtube video and that is exactly what I want to do. Can this photosynth website that we are right now do something similar to that or do I have to wait for the TechFest program to come out?
NateLawrence (Over 1 year ago)
Hi, sniziolek.

Yes, the Photosynth website that we are using and the Windows app that goes along with it can do something similar and have been able to, ever since 2008.

Here is an example by Tan Nguyen: 
http://bit.ly/dougsynthd3d (Open this in Internet Explorer or Firefox 3 for Windows (not Firefox 4)
Note that you can turn the object around by clicking on the halo that appears in the middle of the current photo and dragging the halo around to view other photos. You can also turn the photos off with the [P] key and use the halo to turn the point cloud around to views that no photos were taken from.

Here is the same example in the normal Silverlight viewer: http://bit.ly/dougsynth
It should be able to be viewed in any Windows or Mac web browser. Note that although the handle is different graphically, you can still click and drag on the circular arrows that appear in the center of the screen to turn the sculpture around.
NateLawrence (Over 1 year ago)
With Photosynth, you can actually capture multiple objects or parts of a scene and synth them together into a single environment.

Here's an example of mine where I circled each dish on the table (giving each dish its own halo handle) and also circled the table as a whole.
http://bit.ly/tablesynthd3d
http://bit.ly/tablesynth 

Here's an example where I circled each pedestal in a monument: 
http://bit.ly/veteranmemoriald3d
http://bit.ly/veteranmemorial

Here's an example where I circled individual flowers in a rose garden:
http://bit.ly/orbitalsynthd3d
http://bit.ly/orbitalsynth

For more information, here are some materials from the Photosynth team: 
Video Tutorial: http://photosynth.net/create.aspx (Pay attention to 1:55 - 2:12.)
Photosynth Photography Guide: http://photosynth.net/help.aspx#photosynthhelp (Very helpful!)

Some other thoughts about shooting synths: http://bit.ly/sinkorsynth http://bit.ly/shootingforreconstruction
NateLawrence (Over 1 year ago)
Microsoft Research's Spin Movies (what was shown at TechFest) have two key improvements over Photosynth's current viewer.

1: The photos are actually being projected onto the point cloud, instead of onto flat rectangles.

2: Since you know that a spin movie is just going to go all around something, you can decide to load all the photos before you start spinning the object, which gives a better rotating experience, since you don't have to wait for any of the photos to load. This 'load everything first' mentality if more traditional, like loading a video game level before you can play it or for a more direct comparison, like QuickTime VR object movies. See http://www.proxima-veritati.auckland.ac.nz/insula9/objects.html (requires Apple QuickTime to be installed) for a nice demo of QTVR objects.
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