Gullfoss Waterfall, Iceland

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TonyErnst

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Description

Gullfoss is formed where a river hits a fault line and plunges over it taking a 90 degree turn along the way. Geology in action.

I was in Iceland just after the summer solstice which means it never really got dark. These photos were taken between 10 and 11 PM.

I debated whether or not to break this synth up into a few smaller, but synthier synths, but decided having the full experience in one synth was probably the way to go.

Taken June 29, 2004
Gullfoss Nature Preserve, Iceland

You can see more of my photography at: http://tonyernst.com
Stats
Synthy 45%
Views 339
Favorites 1
Photos 47
Date Created 5/16/2009
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Comments

(3)
tbenedict Over 1 year ago
It's a real treat going through your synths. Most of the ones I've done have been "full coverage" style, with big panoramas covering all the angles, but not focusing on any one thing. Looking at yours, it's obvious you're composing each shot to be a still photo in and of itself. Moving through the synth is a lot more like looking through a photography book. Way more artistic. The last highlight, the one of the spray from the falls, is gorgeous.
TonyErnst Over 1 year ago
Thanks for the compliments Tom. I've been going through my archives and creating synths of anything I have more than 10 shots of. This means that none of the images were taken with photosynth in mind, and therefore each was composed separately. In my head creating photosynths and taking individual photos are two different tasks. With my newer synths I've made a conscious effort to document the place with a couple panos from every direction to create a "scaffold" and then take my time and compose individual images to provide the detail - and as a bonus these usually work well as highlights.
TonyErnst Over 1 year ago
And by the way, you need to start adding some favorites! I just looked and you've only favorited 2 synths :-)
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