Monumental

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Nathanael

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...a marble relief sculpture by Leo Friedlander showing a standing Sacagawea pointing the way for the mounted explorers was dedicated at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem in 1938. Known as Lewis and Clark Led by Sacajawea, its base carries the legend "Westward the star of empire takes its way."

-Quoted from Chief Washakie Foundation
Link:
http://www.windriverhistory.org/exhibits/sacajawea/sac03.htm
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Sacagawea (also Sakakawea, Sacajawea; [sɑ.kaː.ʒə.wiː.ə]) (c. 1788 – December 20, 1812) was a Shoshone woman who accompanied the Lewis and Clark Expedition, led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, in their exploration of the Western United States. She traveled thousands of miles from North Dakota to the Pacific Ocean between 1804 and 1806. She was nicknamed Janey by Clark.

Reliable historical information about Sacagawea is extremely limited, but she has become an important part of the Lewis and Clark mythology in the American public imagination. The National American Woman Suffrage Association of the early twentieth century adopted her as a symbol of women's worth and independence, erecting several statues and plaques in her memory, and doing much to spread the story of her accomplishments.

The Sacagawea dollar coin issued by the United States Mint depicts Sacagawea and her son, Jean Baptiste. The face on the coin was modeled on a modern Shoshone-Bannock woman named Randy'L He-dow Teton; no contemporary image of Sacagawea exists.

-Quoted from Wikipedia
Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacajawea
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Date Created 3/30/2009
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Comments

(2)
dariusmonsef Over 1 year ago
Very cool. You should add some highlights to the back of the statue... took me a little while to figure out how to navigate back there.
Nathanael Over 1 year ago
Thanks for the jab in the ribs. :)

Unfortunately not much thought went into framing the photos for composition. A second visit to the monument may be in order to get some decent details of the Oregon trail reliefs etc. for highlighting.
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