National Geographic: Stonehenge Revealed

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Joshua

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Description

Complete survey (interior and exterior) of Stonehenge.

Photographs by Becky Hale, National Geographic Society.
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Synthy 100%
Views 27098
Favorites 99
Photos 436
Date Created 7/17/2008
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Comments

(9)
blaise Over 1 year ago
The pointcloud on this one is killer. Stone is full of synther-friendly features, hence synths really well. Especially when shot with nice equipment, as here.
On an unrelated note, the Stonehenge Riverside Project (2003-2008) seems to have concluded that Stonehenge was a burial site, not an astrological calculating machine or flying saucer landing pad.. oh well..
David-Photosynth-Team Over 1 year ago
To examine the point cloud, find a photo that offers the green halo, then press p (to just show the points), then grab the halo and jerk it around with abandon. Press p twice again to get back to normal point cloud mode.
Scott Over 1 year ago
Becky found a tiny brown rabbit hidden under one of the smaller stones in the middle. He's tough to find, but he's in the synth!
blaise Over 1 year ago
Ctrl also works for revealing the pointcloud!
payam195r Over 1 year ago
Beautiful photosynth.
Odd-and-Even Over 1 year ago
Stonehenge was built a long time ago with the hope it would one day be Photosynthed.
Fere Over 1 year ago
All Stonehenge photos from diferent synths should be merged to create the ultimate synth :P
Nathanael Over 1 year ago
I take it that Becky took photos to construct this synth with either:
1) multiple cameras,
2) multiple memory cards, or
3) cherry picked from among more than 1000 shots
without renaming any of the photos to form a single cohesive filename order, being that using [.] and [,] does not serve well here.

That being said, I still love the synth.
Joshua Over 1 year ago
IIRC, she captured all of these with a single camera over several days (using multiple cards no doubt). We then went through removing duplicate shots - cherrypicking to be sure - and experimenting along the way. I think you'd agree that the results worked out quite well.
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